Bell improves call quality with HD Voice


Cellphones. I have a love/hate relationship with them.

I love the functionality they offer. I love the way I can reach into my pocket and have the entire internet at my finger tips wherever I happen to be. I love the freedom of being able to share the details of my life with those who matter to me be it on Facebook, Twitter or a simple text message.

But I gotta tell you, I’ve never been happy with the nature of voice calling on these things. There’s just something about the majority of cellphone calls – especially when you’re *not* the one on the cellphone. The compression of sounds, the occasional latency, that sensation that the other person is a the end of a very long and narrow tube through which you both must shout to be heard. It doesn’t matter which handset you own or whose network you’re on. It’s so commonplace these days that I think many of us have just learned to put up with it.

So when I heard that Bell is about roll out an upgrade to their voice network that will dramatically improve the quality of these voice calls, I was all ears.

The new feature is called HD Voice, and Bell is going to be the first national network operator in Canada to offer it. The system has already been introduced in Europe from Orange.

Effectively, HD Voice doubles the amount of network bandwidth allocated to voice calls. More bandwidth means less compression and thus better quality. It’s a little bit like the difference between an audio CD that has been converted into an MP3 file at 64kbps vs. one that has been encoded at 128kbps. As any MP3 aficionado will tell you, the 128kbps version sounds a lot closer to the original CD. HD Voice also improves the amount of noise cancellation on calls, so if you’re calling from an especially busy place like a mall or a street corner, those background sounds should be greatly reduced.

Curious to know just how much better HD Voice will sound? So was I. Bell doesn’t have any sample audio clips to share with us at the moment and I haven’t been able to test the system myself, but I was able to find the following video from the U.K. thanks to the gang at MobileSyrup, and if Bell’s version of HD Voice is anywhere as good as this, I’ll be a much happier camper.

 

 

Alright, now that we’re all sold on the whole HD Voice promise, let’s talk about how you actually get this feature.

First the good news: Bell will be making HD Voice an automatic and free upgrade for all of their mobility subscribers.

Now the caveats: HD Voice only works on specific handsets for now. Specifically: HTC Sensation, HTC Incredible S, Nokia C6-00 and Nokia C6-01. According to Bell, these handsets are currently the only ones they carry that have the necessary software to enable HD Voice. It’s expected that many more handsets currently on the market will be given a software upgrade to make them HD Voice capable, but no details have emerged just yet.

And, more importantly, you’ll only benefit from HD Voice if you and the person you’re speaking with are both using compatible handsets and you’re both on the Bell (or Virgin) HSPA+ network. Unfortunately, this means that landline parties or those on a different mobile network will still hear the lower quality call, even if you’re using an HD Voice handset.

Bell notes on their site that there are still a few areas of the country that won’t be able to support the service, and none of the coverage areas that are outside of the HSPA+ 4G footprint will be able to handle it

(Image credit: Photodisc/Winston Davidian/Getty Images)

Disclosure: Sync.ca and Sync-blog.com are owned and operated by Bell Media, a wholly owned subsidiary of BCE, the parent company of Bell Canada.

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4 comments

  1. Phil

    Singing the praises of RIM is rare these days. The call quality on the Storm is superlative. I can talk in a normal voice no problem hearing others. And we are with Bell, so I am not sure that HD voice is that big a deal. Maybe other phones are more prone to noise and if so then this video demonstration is very interesting. Wonder how much Bell is going to gouge subscribers for?

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  2. Edward Walsh

    Hi Simon:

    Thank you for the article. Sounds (no pun intended) interesting to say the least. I will be curious to see how well this will work as more phones are added to the list of compatible handsets via software upgrades. Hopefully it will be shared across the Telus/Bell Network as I am with Telus in Newfoundland which uses the Bell Network.

    Take care…..

    Edward Walsh
    Marystown, NL
    Canada

    Like

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